2013-07-21 / Community View

Chapel oflove

Introduced at neighboring camps, couple helped build log chapel where they later married
BY KRYSTAL JOHNS 810-452-2601 • kjohns@mihomepaper.com

OREGON TWP. — When she was a Girl Scout, she camped at Camp Sherwood and later worked there. He worked at Camp Holaka, the Boy Scout camp next door. They met, and together they worked to build the sweet log chapel in the woods at Camp Sherwood.

It only seemed fitting, then, that the chapel should be the place where they married.

Camp Sherwood was later incorporated into Camp Holaka, and this is the last summer the Boy Scouts will be using the camp.

Deerfield Township resident Lisa Grossbauer, 58, saw the article about the camp closing on the front page of the July 10 County Press, and the photo of the little chapel in the woods, now somewhat overgrown, where she pledged her life to her husband, Terry, 59.

“I had been hearing a lot of different things, but we were hoping it wasn’t true,” she said. “We were surprised, with all the newer buildings they had in there, and Camp Holaka had put in their waterfront area.”


“I would like to drive through the old trails I used to know, see all the campsites I used to maintain.” “I would like to drive through the old trails I used to know, see all the campsites I used to maintain.” The closing of the camp is the end of an era of memorybuilding for many kids who went through Scouts in Lapeer County, as well as the adults who worked there, but the Grossbauers are fortunate to have their unique memories of creating the chapel from the ground up, using trees from that very land — trees that witnessed them growing, meeting and falling in love — and then marrying there.

“That’s the way we met, so we just decided to do it there,” Lisa said.

June 9, 1974, was a hot, but not-too-hot summer day. Rain was in the forecast but that particular uninvited guest stayed away. At least 150 guests filled the wooden benches on the slope behind the chapel and the couple stood on the porch. She wore a dress she had made and adorned with daisies, symbolic to Girl Scouting, and she carried a bouquet of the flowers she adores to this day. He had longish blond hair and wore a navy suit coat, white pants and shirt and green tie. The Rev. Robert Goudie performed the ceremony, Rolf Winter took the photos, and just like that, Terry and Lisa were man and wife. The reception was held at the Lottie Hutchins Hall on the edge of Davis Lake, and they honeymooned in Port Huron.

Terry grew up near the camp and he was still in high school when he started working there as a grounds maintenance employee. He also worked in the kitchen as a helper and second cook. Lisa started out camping there and then worked as a counselor, second cook, and “wherever they needed me.” As fate would have it, both were needed to help build the chapel.


Lisa and Terry Grossbauer, pictured above, then and now, worked together at Camps Sherwood and Holaka to build a chapel in the woods. They married there after it was completed in 1974. 
Photo courtesy Lisa and Terry Grossbauer Lisa and Terry Grossbauer, pictured above, then and now, worked together at Camps Sherwood and Holaka to build a chapel in the woods. They married there after it was completed in 1974. Photo courtesy Lisa and Terry Grossbauer The little chapel was built as a memorial for Dorothy L. Swart, and it was modeled after the Lumberman’s Chapel at Hartwick Pines State Park near Grayling. It took the better part of a summer and fall to build it and it was finished in 1974. The dedication ceremony took place a week before the Grossbauers were married.

Lisa said she has a Girl Scout alumni event out at the camp at the end of August, so she will get to say goodbye.

“I would like to drive through the old trails I used to know, see all the campsites I used to maintain,” added Terry.



This postcard was made for the dedication ceremony of the chapel at Camp Sherwood in June 1974. This postcard was made for the dedication ceremony of the chapel at Camp Sherwood in June 1974.

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