2017-06-18 / Insight

More than father and son

Almont men are partners and friends
BY PHIL FOLEY
810-452-2616 • pfoley@mihomepaper.com


Steven and Steve Schneider aren’t just father and son, they work together in Steve’s Almont law firm and are colleagues on the Almont Village Council. 
Photo by Phil Foley Steven and Steve Schneider aren’t just father and son, they work together in Steve’s Almont law firm and are colleagues on the Almont Village Council. Photo by Phil Foley ALMONT — Few relationships are as complex as father and son. Google it and you get 93.7 million postings in .56 seconds and few of them agree.

Steve and Steven Schneider don’t always agree to everything, but they do agree they are both where they want to and should be.

Steve, 73, has operated his law firm in Almont since 1994 and been a village council member since 1995.

Steven, who turns 30 Monday (June 19) has been his father’s office manager and law clerk for a decade and was elected to the village council for the first time last November.

The one thing they agree on completely is that there is more to life than simply making money. “You’ve got to make a living, but our main thrust is helping people,” Steve said as Steven nodded.


Steven and Steve Schneider even bring their dogs to work — Max and Chance. Chance was a gift from the younger Schneider to the elder. 
Photo by Phil Foley Steven and Steve Schneider even bring their dogs to work — Max and Chance. Chance was a gift from the younger Schneider to the elder. Photo by Phil Foley Steven said his interest in making sure Almont becomes a better place to live has intensified since he’ll be a father himself in September.

Steve said his interest in the wider world around him and politics were sparked by his own father when he was a boy in Detroit’s Seven Mile and Evergreen area. Steve’s father got him interested in stamp collecting.

For Steven the spark heated up when he was 16 or 17 and he spent the summer in Washington, D.C. for Leadership America. “I got to shake hands with the much hated Hillary,” he recalled.

More importantly, he found politics could be a force for good, if done correctly.

Steve said his son has “a big heart.”

Steven said his father “had a hands-off approach as a father that makes sense now.” He said while his father would mentor him, he “let me figure things out myself.”

Steven said, “We’re pretty much in constant debate.”

Steve agreed, smiling broadly, noting that while they may differ on specifics, “in the end we pretty much want the same thing.”

Steven noted that while he was growing up, his father put in long hours in his law practice. But he added, “I spent every weekend with my dad listening to boring old NPR.”

Another thing the two agree on is the importance of family. After graduating from high school, Steven spent a few years in the Nine Mile and Woodward area, but the pull of family and Almont brought him back and last year he bought a house about a mile from his father’s home.

“Dad comes over for Sunday dinner every week,” Steven said, adding “We’ll go there when he starts to cook.”

Steven said, “Family is undervalued in our society.” He said the value of family is something he got from his maternal grandfather, Dr. Robert Lang, who was the town doctor for half a century.

The pair said they only become closer as they’ve gotten older. “We like the same sports teams. We vacation together,” Steven said.

Steven said they’re good for each other. “My son is very literate from a technology standpoint. I am not.”

Steve said his father, four decades his senior, has a breadth of experience he does not. “I could have no better teacher,” he said.

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